BCM320 Digital ArteFact: Reading Top Comments: A Non-Canonical Way to Transcultural & Media Studies

As part of the Digital Asia (BCM320) subject, I have been developing a digital artefact (DA) addressing my individual autoethnographic experience and research into the Sinophone sphere. Initially inspired by the live-tweeting session of Guardian (2018; aka Zhen Hun) in BCM320, I gave a trial account of my independent autoethnographic investigation, which looks into the potential of translated Chinese netizens’ top comments in broadening cultural outsiders’ knowledge about the Sinophone world as well as the Chinese culture. Despite the media ritual of reading comments, as I became busier towards the end of the semester, I outlined a plan for the conducting of my research and related practices to ensure the progress of my DA. 

(You can find my digital artefact presentation at the end of this post or click the embedded link if you would like to read right away)

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BCM320: Unpacking My Individual Autoethnography

In my individual autoethnography for the Digital Asia (BCM320) class, I studied my media consumption on Facebook. Overall, I looked into my habit of reading translated C-netizens’ comments as a way to gain insights into China’s media industry as well as its culture.

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BCM320 Blog Post 2: Positioning Myself in the Flow(s) of Cultures

After two consecutive weeks of exploring South Korea, I reached the third destination in my Digital (East) Asia (BCM320) journey – Japan – by examining Akira (1988), which is widely regarded as one of the greatest anime ever made.

Set in a dystopian 2019, Akira (1988) tells the story of how a secret military project endangers Neo-Tokyo when it turns a biker gang member into a rampaging psychic psychopath who can only be stopped by two teenagers and a group of psychics (IMDB)
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BCM320 Blog Post 1: (Re)considering My Lens of Viewing Asian Cultures: A Lesson from #TheHost Screening Session

Set along the Han River, The Host (2006) is a South Korean monster blockbuster, which around a middle-class family’s search-and-rescue attempt to save their youngest family member kidnapped by a monster emerging from the formaldehyde-contaminated river.
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BCM325 Reflection 2: Swimming in the Flood of tweets

As proposed in my previous reflection on live-tweeting, I began interacting (following, retweeting, liking) with more friends and paying more attention to online discussions on Twitter in this second phase of weekly screenings. However, it was not until week 9 that I could pre-write tweets based on background research of films.

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Peer-Review: A Vicarious (Mutual) Learning Process in the Role of a Feedback Provider

Throughout the Future Cultures (BCM325) subject, I have often questioned myself about the purpose of writing reflections on my role as a feedback producer of my peers’ presentations. While feedback receipt generates a critical self-reflection (Nicol et al. 2014: 102), which plays a cardinal role in the higher education independent learning environment (Nicol et al. 2014: 113), feedback provision appears to hold little reflective values. I used to ponder that feedback provision was a non-reciprocal process, which only benefited my peers’ (the receivers) performances and somehow, my tutor’s (the main feedback producer) workload share. Hence, I found commenting on my classmates’ projects time-consuming. 

However, my perspective changed in this second round of peer-commenting on Oliva’s, Jessica’s and Susie’s beta presentations of digital artefacts (DA). By employing dual roles as a reader and a researcher, I felt that I could suggest further research directions, enrich my friends’ justifications for method usage and concept development, and improve their DA’s utility in turn. Compared to the previous commenting round, this time, I eschew echoing already preexisting feedback by not reading the beta posts’ comment sections beforehand.  

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BCM325 Reflection on My Feeback For Other Students’ Digital Artefact Pitches

As part of the BCM325 subject, I was assigned to comment on three digital artifacts (DA) amid the themes of futures cultures. Overall, I was impressed with my friends’ innovative thinking, and I tried my best to identify their strengths and weaknesses based on the criteria of the subject’s first assignment (please ignore my careless typos as I was in a rush for meeting deadlines), as well as suggested ways to improve their future DAs. During the process of giving feedback, I found myself spending much time considering how to comment constructively. Speaking an emotive mother tongue, I am aware that my careless word usage can result in offending people. Also, as I was the second commenter (2 out of 3 posts), I was concerned about repeating the first commenter’s ideas, which can prevent me from recognising unexplored qualities of the pitches.

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